Posts tagged ‘death’

11 September 2013

Between Dog and Wolf by Audrey Hays

Stunning pictures. I had to share it here.

Aubrey Hays created the series ‘Between Dog and Wolf’ where she explores our lives taking place in between domesticity and wilderness. Her pictures are shot at sunrise or sunset, when the light wavers in such that a dog on the horizon could perhaps be the lurking shadow of a wolf. Aubrey’s body fits oddly into the surrounding, sometimes she even appears almost invisible, blending with the nature around her. She’s grappling with the uncomfortable, the disquiet, the unknown, she points on our overwhelming need to overcome isolation within these rural spaces. ‘Through the perseverance of remaining within the landscape, sturdiness takes shape as the wolf appears. It is my ever-challenging paradox of intimacy and distance, which draws me to the environment, yet stands in the way of my ever fully anchoring to a place.’

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Hays_Aubrey07Via Ignant.

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1 October 2011

Euthanasia Coaster by Julijonas Urbonas

Crazy. What a lovely way to end a crapy life… just a little bit macabre to design. By Julijonas Urbonas. His Domestic Earthquake Generator worth the click too.

 

“Euthanasia Coaster” is a hypothetic euthanasia machine in the form of a roller coaster, engineered to humanely – with elegance and euphoria – take the life of a human being. Riding the coaster’s track, the rider is subjected to a series of intensive motion elements that induce various unique experiences: from euphoria to thrill, and from tunnel vision to loss of consciousness, and, eventually, death. Thanks to the marriage of the advanced cross-disciplinary research in space medicine, mechanical engineering, material technologies and, of course, gravity, the fatal journey is made pleasing, elegant and meaningful. Celebrating the limits of the human body but also the liberation from the horizontal life, this ‘kinetic sculpture’ is in fact the ultimate roller coaster: John Allen, former president of the famed Philadelphia Toboggan Company, once sad that “the ultimate roller coaster is built when you send out twenty-four people and they all come back dead. This could be done, you know.”

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